Burnin’ Up! This Week’s Most Popular Home Was Truly on Fire

An enterprising agent named Dylan Jaeck wanted everyone to check out the smokin’ deal he had on sale—an empty lot in Florida where a home had burned to the ground.

So instead of the customary shots of the vacant lot and its location, he used photos from the actual house fire. And the internet took notice, making it this week’s most popular property on realtor.com®.

Jaeck told us that his blazingly brilliant idea worked as he had expected it would, and now the property is under contract for close to the asking price.

Here are just a couple of the social media reactions to the photos:

Can’t stop thinking about this https://t.co/5VSQFJXike listing of a house for 100k that is literally on fire pic.twitter.com/vuA8hoGAGX

— Hayley Phillips (@somecallmehay) July 31, 2019

Hot listing: Florida house hits market with a photo of the place on fire https://t.co/arzytT3YfJ pic.twitter.com/NRpg46x0fi

— Cristina Alves (@__cristinaalves) August 4, 2019

“I wanted something that would grab somebody’s attention and show how hot of a deal this was for a potential investor to build a home or to fix,” Jaeck says.

His wasn’t the only home to crack our list thanks to attention-grabbing photos. A Virginia home also went viral using the tried-and-true T. rex costume concept. That home is also now pending sale.

Other popular properties this week included a massive, $75 million Beverly Hills megamansion, Phil Kessel’s strangely barren mansion near Pittsburgh, and a wildly decorated Victorian in Scranton, PA.

See all of the homes HERE

How do I Negotiate a Counter offer?


The preparation of a counteroffer allows you as the seller and your agent to take control of negotiations after a prospective buyer submits a purchase offer. Your agent, on receiving a prospective buyer’s offer, will review with you:

  • The terms offered and contingency provisions — conditions — which affect closing;
  • The likely net sales proceeds the offer will generate; and
  • Their knowledge about the profit tax liability you will likely incur on the sale when the property is not your primary residence.

A counteroffer is made when the terms and conditions of the buyer’s offer are for any reason unacceptable without a change. Your agent prepares your written counteroffer and reviews it with you before you sign it and your agent submits it to the buyer. Your signed counteroffer documents your intent to be bound by your offer to sell when the buyer accepts.

To counter a buyer’s unacceptable purchase offer, your agent may recommend that they:

  • Prepare your counteroffer on a new purchase agreement form;
  • Prepare your counteroffer on a counteroffer form;
  • Dictate escrow instructions based on terms and conditions orally negotiated with the buyer (or buyer’s agent);
  • Set up an auction environment by calling for the submission of all “best and final” offers in a multiple-offer situation; or
  • Orally advise the buyer’s agent about the changes they need to make before you will accept the buyer’s offer.

The buyer may agree to purchase your property on the terms stated in your counteroffer by merely signing the counteroffer and delivering it as accepted, or submit a counteroffer back to you for
further negotiations.

Mortgage Rates Drop Significantly

There is a tug of war in the financial markets between weaker business sentiment and consumer sentiment. Business sentiment is declining on negative trade and manufacturing headlines, but consumer sentiment remains buoyed by a strong labor market and low rates that will continue to drive home sales into the fall.

Monthly Market Overview North San Diego County July 2019

In July, the U.S. economic expansion that began in June 2009 became the longest in the nation’s history, marking 121 straight months of gross domestic product growth and surpassing the 120-month expansion from 1991 to 2001. The average rate of growth during this expansion has been a milder 2.3 percent per year compared to 3.6 percent during the 1990s. Although the economy should continue to perform well for the rest of 2019, most economists see a mild recession on the horizon.

  • Closed Sales decreased 1.4 percent for Detached homes but increased 2.8 percent for Attached homes.
  • Pending Sales increased 10.4 percent for Detached homes and 11.9 percent for Attached homes.
  • The Median Sales Price was down 3.9 percent to $720,000 for Detached homes and 1.7 percent to $470,000 for Attached homes.
  • Days on Market decreased 3.0 percent for Detached homes but increased 25.0 percent for Attached homes.
  • Supply decreased 6.3 percent for Detached homes but remained flat for Attached homes.

During the record-setting 121-month economic expansion, the unemployment rate has dropped from 10.0 percent in 2009 to 3.7 percent, yet many consumers continue to struggle financially.

Low mortgage interest rates have helped offset low housing affordability, but high home prices are outpacing median household income growth.

In a move to stoke continued economic prosperity, the Federal Reserve reduced the benchmark interest rate by a quarter point to about 2.25 percent, marking the first reduction in more than a decade.

San Diego North County Monthly Housing Market Indicators July 2019. Listings, Sales, Days on Market and more broken out by zip code.

July19-Monthly

Farm Turned Rustic-Chic Wedding Venue Is the Week’s Most Popular Home

Hang the twinkling lights, break out the flower crowns, and don’t forget the Mason jar candle holders, because a Pinterest-perfect farmhouse wedding venue is this week’s most popular home on realtor.com®. The meticulously manicured 10-acre spread is a romantic spot tailor-made for a party—and Instagram. Hashtags not included.

On the market for $695,000, the Michigan property provides a turn-key wedding barn, reception hall, outdoor bar, and fire pit. There’s also a five-bedroom main house that’s ideal for the future proprietor of this clickworthy business opportunity.

Other properties you clicked on this week include a massive castle built by an oral surgeon in Wisconsin over the course of a decade, a classic SoCal home that was the scene of a notorious murder, and an over-the-top decor explosion in Detroit still awaiting a buyer.

It’s been a week of style-forward searches—all of this week’s most popular homes have their own distinct aesthetic and point of view. Strike a pose and have a look… See all 10 of the homes HERE!

Senior, 55+ yo, Carry Forward

A: If you’re a California homeowner aged 55 or older, you have a once-in-a-lifetime right to sell your home and carry forward its current assessed
value to a replacement residence of equal or lesser value.

To qualify to carry forward the current assessed value:

  • You need to own and occupy the home sold as well as the replacement home;
  • Both homes must be eligible for the homeowner’s $7,000 property tax exemption;
  • You or your spouse must be at least 55 years old or severely and permanently disabled on the closing date of the sale of your old home;
  • You need to purchase (or construct) a replacement home of equal or lesser value than the home you sold
  • The replacement residence must be located:
    • In the same county as the property sold; or
    • Within another participating county; and
    • The purchase (or construction) of the replacement home needs to close (or construction completed) within two years before or after closing the sale of your old home.

When your replacement home is not within the same county as the home you sold, the county of your replacement property needs to be a participating county which allows the carry-forward assessment from your prior county.

Currently participating counties include Alameda, El Dorado, Los Angeles,
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Tuolumne and Ventura counties (subject to change).

Only one carry-forward assessment exemption is allowed per married couple. For example, if a married couple takes a carry-forward assessment exemption, and one spouse later dies, the surviving spouse may not take a carry-forward assessment exemption even if they later remarry.

When you and a co-owner both reside in the home and are not married, you both individually qualify for the carry-forward assessment. However, on the sale, only one of you may use the exemption.

Thus, the co-owner who does not apply for the exemption is precluded from any future use of the assessment carry-forward tax relief.

The only exception is when you become severely and permanently disabled after receiving the carryforward tax relief due to your age. In this case, you
may use the exemption a second time under a separate claim due to the disability.